Offbeat

Soaps or sanitisers? What fights coronavirus better

Washington D.C.: In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, health-specialists have been emphasising upon the importance of keeping your hands germ-free, either through the use of soaps or hand sanitisers.

The New York Post talked to Dr Nahid Bhadelia from Boston Medical Center, about the effectiveness, appropriate usage and correct choice of hand cleaning products that provide protection against COVID-19.

Dr Bhadelia said that "from what we know about this coronavirus, it's similar to SARS and MERS, so it should not be that difficult of a microorganism to kill," therefore "soap and water, and alcohol-based hand sanitizers, can kill it."

Meticulous hand washing is your best bet to get rid of the grime that clings to the hand, that might harbour nasty pathogens, including the coronavirus.

Clean hands are "also going to protect you from other infectious diseases, too, like the flu and diarrheal diseases," said Dr Bhadelia to New York Post.

According to the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there isn't enough scientific evidence available to suggest that antibacterial soaps are any better than their normal counterparts for disease prevention.

The New York Post suggests that, in situations where washing your hands is not possible, wipes and hand sanitizer can prove to be useful in eliminating dangerous microorganisms.

The American Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends hand sanitisers with a minimum of 60 per cent alcohol content are the best choice.

However, soap or sanitisers are of no use if not used correctly, warned Dr Bhadelia.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests using clean running water of any temperature to wet the hands before applying the soap.

The hands then must be thoroughly scrubbed, making sure that the backside, the place between the fingers and the underside of nails are not left out.

The lathering process must be carried out for a span of 20 seconds minimum, after which the hands should be dried out with a clean towel or an air dryer. 

One plus unintentionally disables 'X-Ray' filter with an update

Shenzhen [China]: Smartphone manufacturer company OnePlus accidentally pushed an over-the-air update that disables a filter that can see through some ...

AI helps researchers up-cycle waste carbon

Washington D.C.: In a breakthrough study, researchers are using artificial intelligence (AI) to accelerate progress in transforming waste carbon into ...

Sea level could rise more than 1 metre by 2100 if emission targets not met

Potsdam [Germany]: Global mean sea-level rise could exceed 1 metre by 2100 and 5 metres by 2300 with unchecked emissions, a survey among 100 leading i...

Soaps or sanitisers? What fights coronavirus better

Washington D.C.: In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, health-specialists have been emphasising upon the importance of keeping your hands germ-free, ei...